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Water is perhaps uniquely, an economic, societal and environmental risk. Lack of water has an immediate and catastrophic impact on human, societal and economic viability. In ‘Thirsty Planet Revisited’ we provide a fresh look at water risk and opportunity, and provide a new section on the interconnected links of water shortage and climate change. We look at the ability of new technology such as forward osmosis to make desalination a solution of scale in many waterstressed parts of the world.

Thirsty Planet Revisited

Neville White Neville White Head of RI Policy & Research
Thirsty Planet Revisited
Amity Insight reports

Thirsty Planet Revisited

Neville White


Head of RI Policy & Research

In 2011 we published the first of a two-part resource series ‘Thirsty Planet’ which looked at water threat, stress and opportunity. This noted that a rising population was ‘likely to place unprecedented strain on the world’s natural resources [and]…the ability for vast sections of the population to access fresh water’.

Six years on, we view the challenge of providing clean, potable water to a growing, urban population, balanced against the demands of agriculture, commerce and industry to be among the most pressing and urgent. Indeed the World Economic Forum’s (WEF) annual Global Risk Report1 has placed ‘water crises’ in the top three global risks in terms of impact since 2012. For the WEF, the impact of water crises is second only to extreme weather events and the use of weapons of mass destruction – whilst a significant water crisis is now considered more likely than either food related crises, or the failure of financial systems and institutions.

Water is perhaps uniquely, an economic, societal and environmental risk. Lack of water has an immediate and catastrophic impact on human, societal and economic viability. In ‘Thirsty Planet Revisited’ we provide a fresh look at water risk and opportunity, and provide a new section on the interconnected links of water shortage and climate change. We look at the ability of new technology such as forward osmosis to make desalination a solution of scale in many waterstressed parts of the world.

The Insight looks too at the broad investment value chain and the opportunities for responsible investors in the $600bn global water sector providing sustainable solutions in the water and waste-water sectors.

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As always, we hope you enjoy this Amity Insight, and we welcome your comments and feedback.

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